Nagasaki survivor visits the U.S. town that fueled his city's destruction
2018-08-09 00:00:00


WILLIAM BRANGHAM: A very unique museum inWashington state tells the history of how(1)
WILLIAM BRANGHAM:华盛顿州一个非常独特的博物馆讲述了历史

America built one of the atomic bombs droppedon Japan near the end of World War II.(2)
美国在第二次世界大战结束时建造了一枚落在日本的原子弹。

As Jenny Cunningham of PBS station KCTS inSeattle explains, this museum recently hosted(3)
正如西雅图PBS站KCTS的Jenny Cunningham所说,这个博物馆最近举办了

a very unique visitor.(4)
一个非常独特的访客。

NARRATOR: Our nation possessed the ingredientsfor the most powerful weapon ever conceived,(5)
旁白:我们的国家拥有有史以来最强大武器的成分,

and the secret was out.(6)
而秘密已经消失了。

JENNY CUNNINGHAM: As part of the ManhattanProject during World War II, the U.S. government(7)
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:作为第二次世界大战期间曼哈顿计划的一部分,美国政府

chose an area near Hanford, Washington, asthe site where scientists would try to produce(8)
选择华盛顿州汉福德附近的一个地区作为科学家们试图生产的地方

plutonium.(9)
钚。

The plutonium was sent to New Mexico, whereit was used in the first test of an atomic(10)
钚被送到新墨西哥州,在那里它被用于第一次原子试验

bomb.(11)
炸弹。

JOHN FOX, Tour Guide, B Reactor Museum: Whenthe bomb was dropped, there was the expectation(12)
约翰福克斯,导游,B反应堆博物馆:炸弹落下时,有期待

it was so horrible, that it would be the endof the war.(13)
它太可怕了,这将是战争的结束。

JENNY CUNNINGHAM: For a decade, the Departmentof Energy has offered public tours of B Reactor,(14)
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:十年来,能源部提供了B反应堆的公共旅游,

where workers processed uranium into plutoniumto fuel some of the first atomic bombs.(15)
工人们将铀加工成钚,为一些第一颗原子弹加油。

The popular behind-the-scenes look insidea nuclear site has attracted a new kind of(16)
核站点内流行的幕后外观吸引了一种新的现象

visitor to Eastern Washington, the atomictourist.(17)
访问东华盛顿,原子旅游者。

But Hanford has never experienced an atomictourist like this man.(18)
但汉福德从来没有经历过这样的原子旅游者。

Of the thousands of people who have touredthe world's original large-scale plutonium(19)
数千人参观了世界上最初的大型钚

reactor, Mitsugi Moriguchi is the first personto do so in a radiation-blocking jumpsuit.(20)
反应器,Mitsugi Moriguchi是第一个穿着防辐射连身衣的人。

It is a startling sight that becomes lesssurprising when you learn why he's so concerned(21)
当你了解他为何如此关注时,这是一个惊人的景象

about radiation exposure.(22)
关于辐射照射。

Moriguchi is believed to be the first survivorof the Nagasaki bombing to visit Hanford.(23)
Moriguchi被认为是长崎轰炸汉福德的第一位幸存者。

When the bomb exploded, he was 8 years old.(24)
当炸弹爆炸时,他才8岁。

Japanese-American professor Norma Field translates.(25)
日裔美国教授Norma Field翻译。

MITSUGI MORIGUCHI, Atomic Bombing Survivor(through translator): It was a huge explosive(26)
MITSUGI MORIGUCHI,原子弹爆炸幸存者(通过翻译):这是一个巨大的爆炸物

sound.(27)
声音。

Smoke started rising from all over the city.(28)
整个城市的烟雾开始升起。

JENNY CUNNINGHAM: Now 81, Moriguchi wantedto see the place that fueled the bomb that(29)
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:现在81岁,Moriguchi希望看到那个为炸弹加油的地方

destroyed his city.(30)
毁了他的城市。

MITSUGI MORIGUCHI (through translator): Icame here because I wanted to know what the(31)
MITSUGI MORIGUCHI(通过翻译):我来到这里因为我想知道什么

town that produced plutonium is doing today,and what it plans to go on doing in the future.(32)
生产钚的城镇今天正在做,以及它计划在未来继续做什么。

JENNY CUNNINGHAM: Moriguchi has come to makea case that the stories of bomb survivors(33)
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:Moriguchi已经开始报道炸弹幸存者的故事

should be part of a new national park createdin 2015.(34)
应成为2015年新国家公园的一部分。

The Manhattan Project National Historic Parkpreserves three World War II sites where the(35)
曼哈顿计划国家历史公园保留了三个二战场地

United States developed the first atomic weapons.(36)
美国研制出第一种原子武器。

The Park Service is working on new contentthat will be presented at Los Alamos, New(37)
Park Service正在开发新内容,将在新奥斯陆的Alamos展出

Mexico, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford.(38)
墨西哥,橡树岭,田纳西州和汉福德。

MITSUGI MORIGUCHI (through translator): Welearned that it was going to become a national(39)
MITSUGI MORIGUCHI(通过翻译):我们了解到它将成为一名国民

park, and we in Nagasaki were quite worried.(40)
公园,我们在长崎非常担心。

Was it going to become a national park toexpress pride?(41)
是否会成为一个表达自豪感的国家公园?

JENNY CUNNINGHAM: Moriguchi's visit was organizedby two Japanese-American professors, and joined(42)
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:Moriguchi的访问由两位日裔美国教授组织,并加入

by a college student and a film crew fromNagasaki.(43)
来自长崎的一名大学生和一名摄制组。

Moriguchi, himself a teacher for 40 years,was eager to tell students at Richland High(44)
守口,他自己40年的老师,渴望告诉里奇兰高中的学生

School what it was like to survive a deadlybomb.(45)
学校生存致命的炸弹是什么感觉。

LILI GOLODO, Student: That makes us rememberthat you were real people and that guys you(46)
LILI GOLODO,学生:这让我们记住你是真正的人,那些人你

existed.(47)
存在。

JENNY CUNNINGHAM: He tried to explain to studentswhy he was offended by the mascot painted(48)
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:他试图向学生解释为什么他被画的吉祥物弄得冒犯了

on the gym floor.(49)
在健身房地板上。

MITSUGI MORIGUCHI (through translator): Peoplewalk on it, but, of course, under the mushroom(50)
MITSUGI MORIGUCHI(通过翻译):人们走在它上面,但当然,在蘑菇下

cloud, people died, so it is like steppingall over graves.(51)
云,人们死了,所以就像踩着坟墓一样。

I can't forgive that.(52)
我无法原谅。

NORMA FIELD, Professor: I think you understood.(53)
NORMA FIELD,教授:我想你明白了。

MITSUGI MORIGUCHI (through translator): Ashock.(54)
MITSUGI MORIGUCHI(通过翻译):震惊。

Just a shock.(55)
只是一个震惊。

JENNY CUNNINGHAM: Students told Moriguchiabout the pride they feel in the school's(56)
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:学生告诉Moriguchi他们对学校的自豪感

two mascots, a mushroom cloud and Day's Pay,a World War II bomber paid for by Hanford(57)
两个吉祥物,蘑菇云和Day's Pay,一个由汉福德支付的第二次世界大战轰炸机

workers.(58)
工人。

RYAN PIPER, Student: What he doesn't understand-- and I know he went through it -- is just(59)
RYAN PIPER,学生:他不明白 - 我知道他经历过 - 只是

how much the Day's Pay and the mushroom cloudmeans to us as a community.(60)
Day's Pay和蘑菇云对我们这个社区意味着多少。

It's like where we started and to see wherewe are now.(61)
这就像我们开始的地方,看看我们现在的位置。

It's just a symbol that means a lot to us.(62)
它只是一个对我们意义重大的象征。

And, unfortunately, to other people, it'sgoing to bring back the bad stuff.(63)
并且,不幸的是,对于其他人来说,它会带回坏的东西。

So...(64)
所以...

JENNY CUNNINGHAM: Standing before this muraldid trigger memories for Moriguchi, including(65)
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:站在这幅壁画之前确实为Moriguchi带来了回忆,包括

walking across Nagasaki with his mother afew days after the bombing.(66)
在轰炸几天后,他和母亲一起穿过长崎。

MITSUGI MORIGUCHI (through translator): Therewas nothing there.(67)
MITSUGI MORIGUCHI(通过翻译):那里什么也没有。

But there was smoke rising here and there,everywhere.(68)
但到处都有烟雾在这里和那里升起。

It was the smoke of cremated bodies of thosewho died.(69)
这是死者尸体的烟雾。

JENNY CUNNINGHAM: The city of Nagasaki, whichhelped fund Moriguchi's visit, wants the suffering(70)
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:长崎市为森口的访问提供资金支持,他希望遭遇苦难

caused by atomic bombs to be part of the storytold by the national park, which is not the(71)
原子弹造成的故事是国家公园讲述的故事的一部分,而不是

current narrative.(72)
目前的叙述。

Tour guide John Fox, who worked for decadesas an engineer at Hanford, described B Reactor(73)
几年来在汉福德工作数十年的导游约翰福克斯描述了B反应堆

as a marvel of science that saved lives, includinghis.(74)
作为拯救生命的科学奇迹,包括他的生命。

JOHN FOX: It saved me from being drafted andparticipating in an invasion of Japan, in(75)
约翰福克斯:它使我免于被选中并参与了日本的入侵

which case I stood a fair chance of endingup there dead on a beach.(76)
在这种情况下,我很有可能在海滩上死去。

JENNY CUNNINGHAM: Kris Kirby, the superintendentof the Manhattan Project National Park, said(77)
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:曼哈顿计划国家公园的负责人Kris Kirby说

the sensitive process of further developingthe park will take years.(78)
进一步发展园区的敏感过程需要数年时间。

That's OK with Moriguchi.(79)
Moriguchi没关系。

He's a patient man who has spent the last72 years telling people about the aftermath(80)
他是一位耐心的人,在过去72年里一直在向人们讲述善后事宜

of the bomb, so that it won't be used again.(81)
炸弹,这样它就不会再被使用了。

The next time Nagasaki survivors come to Hanford,he hopes they will find a national park that(82)
下一次长崎幸存者来到汉福德,他希望他们能找到一个国家公园

represents both American and Japanese pointsof view.(83)
代表了美国和日本的观点。

For the "PBS NewsHour," I'm Jenny Cunninghamin Richland, Washington.(84)
对于“PBS NewsHour”,我是华盛顿里奇兰的Jenny Cunningham。


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